The Counseling-Treatment Units at Emergency Centers for Children and Youth: Findings Following the Upgrade Program

The Counseling-Treatment Units (CTUs) at Emergency Centers for Children and Youth are an important community service for children and youth at the far end of the risk continuum. Their goals are to provide relatively extensive treatment (12 to 18 months) to children and their families. The CTUs serve children who are at high-risk, but do not require immediate removal from home, and for whom there is a reasonable chance that professional intervention can eliminate the need for out-of home placement. The study, which was conducted following efforts to upgrade and expand the CTUs, examines their performance in light of this process.

The main topics addressed by the study are:

  • The size and practice approach of the units
  • The interaction of the CTUs and the internal units of the emergency centers
  • Joint work with other community services
  • Characteristics of CTU staff
  • Characteristic of CTU clients
  • Status of children and families

The study provides current information on the work of the CTUs (and the impact of the upgrade and expansion program), as well as the challenges and issues faced by decision-makers. The findings are being used in formulating policy for the continued development of the service and the enhancement of the CTU’s role in the system of child protection services.

The study findings have been presented at various forums, including the Senior Management of the Service for Children and Youth at the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, and the directors of the Emergency Centers.

The study was initiated by the Service for Children and Youth of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services and Ashalim and funded with the assistance of Ashalim.